Master of Science in Biotechnology Program, UW-Madison

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  • Alumni Perspectives VideosHear M.S. in Biotechnology alumni in their own words.
  • UW-Madison and BiotechnologyA Global Leader in a Growing Field
  • Alumni Case Study: Kim Hartz, Class of 2010"I wanted a program with meaning and value."
  • Alumni Case Study: Chuck Dokken, Class of 2009"I wanted this program to be a game changer for me—and it was."
  • Alumni Case Study: Sridevi Kameswaran, Class of 2011"Biotechnology is the future—and I'm prepared for it."
Alumni Perspectives Videos2 UW-Madison and Biotechnology3 Alumni Case Study: Kim Hartz, Class of 20104 Alumni Case Study: Chuck Dokken, Class of 20095 Alumni Case Study: Sridevi Kameswaran, Class of 20116

A program as unique as you are.

The Master of Science in Biotechnology offers:

  1. A curriculum like no other that integrates topics in science, business and law
  2. Powerful skills that bring the "big picture" of life science product development and commercialization into clear focus
  3. Exclusive evening/weekend courses allowing you to work full-time while enrolled, and
  4. A completed degree in less than two years

What's Being Taught This Week?

Year I: Biotechnology Operations
Session 2: Application of Quality Systems; Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) Introduction and Overview; From CMC to BioManufacturing; BioManufacturing  Facilities, Equipment, and Utilities
Thursday, February 11, (6:00 PM - 9:00 PM)
and Friday morning (8:00 AM - 12:00 PM)
Location: Conf. Room 50, MG&E Building, University Research Park

Faculty Instructors: John Centanni, M.S. and Ed Elder, Ph.D., R.Ph.

The primary objectives of this session are to review the essential elements of establishing and managing Quality Systems; introduce the general principles of Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls; summarize the essential elements of Process Development; and demonstrate the importance of design and control of biomanufacturing facilities, equipment, and utilities.

Year I: Molecular Technologies II
Session 2: Gene Cloning and GMO Detection
Friday, February 12, (2:00 PM - 5:00 PM)
and Saturday morning (8:00 AM - 12:00 PM)
Location: BioPharmaceutical Technology Center Institute lab

Faculty Instructors: Natalie Betz, Ph.D. and Eric Vincent, Ph.D.

Session 2a begins in the laboratory, where we will select bacterial colonies from the bacterial transformation and start mini-prep cultures for analysis in Session 2b. PCR reactions will be assembled using the DNA purified from various foods in Session 1b, to attempt to detect the genetic events associated with GMOs. In addition, a protein-based method called an ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay) will be performed to detect the protein product of the RoundUp Ready Corn 603 GMO event, as well as a protein-based immunoassay strip test for the Cry1Ab Bt11 event.

In the laboratory in Session 2b, we will purify plasmid DNA from the mini cultures of bacteria and then analyze the plasmid DNA with restriction enzymes to verify the correct target gene insert is present, as well as the GMO PCR reactions, will be analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis.

Featured Speaker

Question about the degree?
Contact Kurt

Kurt Zimmerman
Director
Phone: (608) 262-0685
kjzimmerman@wisc.edu
Contact Kurt Zimmerman, Director, M.S. in Biotechnology Program, UW-Madison

Question about admissions?
Contact Lynn

Lynn Schroeder
Program Manager
Phone: (608) 262-9753
lamcnett@wisc.edu
Contact Lynn Schroeder, Program Manager, M.S. in Biotechnology Program, UW-Madison